News

Man celebrates 101st birthday by going to work

Man celebrates 101st birthday by going to work

FOREVER YOUNG: Lighting repair specialist Herman "Hy" Goldman, 101, refurbishes a light fixture in his workshop at Capitol Lighting where he has worked for 73 years, Monday, Aug. 18, in East Hanover, N.J. Now that he has turned 101, Goldman who often said that he would retire when he reached 100, has changed his mind. He still drives himself to work four days a week. Photo: Associated Press/Mel Evans

EAST HANOVER, N.J. (AP) — Herman “Hy” Goldman turned 101 this weekend and won’t quit after 73 years working at the same New Jersey job.

Goldman still shows up four days a week at light fixtures company Capitol Lighting in East Hanover. His co-workers celebrated his birthday with him on Monday.

Aside from a brief absence to serve in the U.S. Army in World War II, Goldman has worked at Capitol Lighting since 1941. The store says he was first hired to sell items and stock and clean the displays.

Co-worker Sandy Ronco says Goldman now specializes in rebuilding items that were damaged or unusable.

Goldman lives in nearby Whippany and still drives himself to work.

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